Advanced Dermasurgery Associates
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Conditions Treated

  • Basal Cell Carcinoma
  • Squamous Cell Carcinoma
  • Melanoma
  • Merkel Cell Carcinoma
  • Angiosarcoma
  • Keratoacanthoma
  • Melanoma-in-situ
  • Spindle Cell Tumors
  • Sebaceous Carcinomas
  • Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans
  • Leimyosarcoma

 

 

Basal Cell Carcinoma

Basal-cell carcinoma pictures - Dallas skin cancer treatment

Basal-cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common human cancer – so common, in fact, that it is estimated that nearly one out of three Caucasians will have it in his or her lifetime. The good news is that it is rarely deadly. Basal cell carcinoma is considered malignant since it can affect a significant amount of surrounding tissue.

Basal-cell carcinoma usually appears on areas of the skin that has had intense exposure to the sun or other forms of ultraviolet light.

Symptoms

Basal-cell carcinoma begins as an open sore, red patch or small, shiny or waxy bump on the ears, face or neck.

The bump slowly enlarges and may bleed, form a white border around a depressed central area or develop a crust. It could also look like a scar in an area where there has been no injury.

Risk

On the back or chest, the basal-cell carcinoma will usually appear as a flat scaly patch that is brown or flesh-colored. These areas can also become quite large if left untreated.

Causes

Two out of three cases of basal-cell carcinoma develop on areas of the skin that have been exposed to sunlight. For this reason, skin cancer such as basal-cell carcinoma has been strongly connected to exposure to sunlight without proper protection such as suntan lotion with an SPF of 30 or greater.

People who use tanning booths are 70% more likely to develop basal-cell carcinoma.

One out of three cases of basal-cell carcinoma are located on areas that are not typically associated with sun exposure, and such areas (including the chest and abdominal areas) are continuing to grow in proportion of cases. Some medical experts have raised the question about whether there is a genetic connection that increases the likelihood in some people of developing the skin cancer.

Treatment

Removal of the cancerous tissue is the most common treatment for basal-cell carcinoma. Since the skin cancer tends to be in delicate and visible areas such as the face and neck, Mohs surgery is commonly used to remove the cancerous tissue, and has a cure rate of 95% or higher.

Other treatments, in rare cases, may include chemotherapy, radiation, immunotherapy, and a drug named Erivedge. These treatments may be used for extremely advanced cases.

View the following video to see how basal cell carcinoma is treated with Mohs surgery.

 

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Squamous-Cell Carcinoma

Squamous-cell carcinoma (SCC) pictures - Dallas skin cancer treatment

Squamous-cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second most common type of skin cancer. Squamous is pronounced both as “skwaw-mas” or “skway-mas.”

Symptoms

Squamous-cell carcinoma appears on areas of the skin of the ears, face, neck, hands or arms. It may begin as a small nodule, and grow into skin plaque or a red ulcer that eats away at tissue surrounding the cancer. It may have hard edges. It is noticeable due to its failure to heal, and may bleed occasionally.

Squamous-cell carcinoma is a skin cancer that often appears in areas that are exposed to sun: scalp, lip, and back of the hand are examples of areas affected by the disease. A pre-cancerous skin lesion known as Actinic Keratosis is the earliest form of squamous-cell carcinoma.

Causes

It is caused by high exposure to sunlight. It appears as rough red bumps and may look scaly and ulcerated. The lower lip is prone to this type of cancer. Any mole skin lesion, wart, or sore that does not heal may become skin cancer.

Risk

Squamous Cell Carcinoma grow faster than Basal Cell Carcinoma and can spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body, including internal organs, causing secondary tumors to grow. Squamous Cell Carcinoma is also found in the digestive and respiratory tracts, as well as the bladder, vagina, cervix and prostate.

Causes

Like most skin cancer, squamous-cell carcinoma is believed to have a strong connection to an exposure to sunlight without proper protection. People who use tanning booths are 2.5 times more likely to develop Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

Treatment

Treatments include excision (removal), sometimes with reconstruction; Mohs surgery; freezing; flaser therapy; radiation therapy; and chemotherapy.

This information is for educational purposes only. Patients should consult their physician for a recommended treatment.

 

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Melanoma

Melanomas are the deadliest form of skin cancer. Melanomas can develop from moles or skin lesions that have changed in appearance, but most do not. To identify a melanoma, follow the ABCDE’s. A is for asymmetry: if you draw a line through the middle of the mole, one side would look different from the other. B is for border irregularity: the border or edge of the mole is uneven, notched or not smooth. C is for color: the color, or pigmentation, of the mole varies in shades of brown, black and tan. D is for diameter: the size of the mole is larger than a pencil eraser. E is for evolution: any changes in an existing mole or other mark on the skin. The area around a melanoma can become red swollen, itchy or burning. Melanomas can grow any where on the body. On men they typically occur on the upper back, and on woman they occur on the legs. Older persons have melanomas occur on the face scalp, ears and neck. Melanomas grow rapidly and spread to other organs including the brain. To confirm a diagnosis of a melanoma, a biopsy must be performed by a doctor. Early detection is important.

 

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Keratoacanthoma

Keratoacanthoma is a benign painless tumor that resembles Squamous Cell Carcinoma and may be related to this cancer. It’s believed to originate from the neck of the hair follicle. It occurs in sun exposed areas like the face, forearms and hands. Keratoacanthoma starts out as a small bump like a pimple and rapidly grows to a mound-shaped body with a central crater filled with keratin (a protein found in skin, nails and hair). If left untreated, it will go away in approximately 6 months. The center plug will push out and the bump will flatten, leaving a depressed scar.

 

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Melanoma-In-Situ

Melanoma-in-situ is a melanoma in the earliest stage. The melanoma is localized on the top layer of skin and has not yet spread to other tissues nor invaded deep layers of skin. Persons diagnosed with melanoma-in-situ who seek medical treatment have the highest survival rate. Even with the high success rate for cure, routine examinations are necessary to detect recurrence. Melanomas found in later stages are not easily or successfully treated.

 

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Other

Merkel Cell Carcinoma

Merkel Cell Carcinoma is a rare, aggressive skin cancer that appears as a flesh-colored or bluish-red bump. It may look like a mole, freckle or bump that changes in size, shape and/or color. It tends to grow fast and spreads quickly to other parts of the body. Merkel Cell Carcinoma can be found on the head, face or neck. It is painless and slight trauma to the area may cause it to bleed, i.e. washing, shaving. Long term sun exposure or a weak immune system including people with HIV infection, increases the risk of developing Merkel Cell Carcinoma. White males are more likely than blacks to be affected.

 

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Angiosarcoma

Angiosarcoma is a rare cancer that is malignant, invasive and rapidly growing. The cause of an angiosarcoma is unknown. Hemangiosarcomas have blood vessels growing into and feeding the tumor. If the tumor ruptures, the person can rapidly bleed to death. Lymphangiosarcomas are developed from the lymphatic vessels. Any time a cancer is in the blood or lymphatic system, cancer cells are easily spread to other parts of the body. Cutaneous Angiosarcomas are usually found in skin or the soft tissue of elderly persons although they can be found in any organ in the body. Angiosarcomas are also associated with persons who have experienced edema (swelling) of the extremities or who have had radiation treatments following radical mastectomies. Exposure to certain chemicals (Vinyl chloride, thorium dioxide or arsenic) has been linked to angiosarcomas in beauticians and industrial workers in the plastics industry. Prognosis for angiosarcomas is poor due to the high recurrence rate and metastases (spreading).

 

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Spindle Cell Tumors

Angiosarcoma is a rare cancer that is malignant, invasive and rapidly growing. The cause of an angiosarcoma is unknown. Hemangiosarcomas have blood vessels growing into and feeding the tumor. If the tumor ruptures, the person can rapidly bleed to death. Lymphangiosarcomas are developed from the lymphatic vessels. Any time a cancer is in the blood or lymphatic system, cancer cells are easily spread to other parts of the body. Cutaneous Angiosarcomas are usually found in skin or the soft tissue of elderly persons although they can be found in any organ in the body. Angiosarcomas are also associated with persons who have experienced edema (swelling) of the extremities or who have had radiation treatments following radical mastectomies. Exposure to certain chemicals (Vinyl chloride, thorium dioxide or arsenic) has been linked to angiosarcomas in beauticians and industrial workers in the plastics industry. Prognosis for angiosarcomas is poor due to the high recurrence rate and metastases (spreading).

 

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Sebaceous Carcinoma

Sebaceous Carcinoma is a rare skin cancer and is only found in areas containing sebaceous glands. About 75% of all sebaceous carcinomas are found on the eyelids. These occur as a small, slowly growing mass and are found on the upper eyelid more often than the lower eyelid. It may have the appearance of a sty or pinkeye. When Sebaceous Carcinoma occurs on the parts of the body, it is a pink to reddish-yellow mass that may bleed. This cancer is aggressive and can spread to the lymph nodes or other areas. Only a biopsy can identify this cancer as it can appear to be another disease or condition.

 

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Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans

Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans is a very rare malignant tumor that occurs in the second layer of skin, the dermis. These tumors are slow growing and are usually found on the torso. The tumor appears as a small bump but then rapidly grows. It will have dark red, pink or bluish discoloration. The tumor thickens and becomes prominent or projected above the surface of the skin. The tumor is classified as a cutaneous soft tissue sarcoma that can metastasize. If the tumor spreads deep into the muscle or bone, extensive reconstruction of the area may be required after the tumor is removed. The occurrence in blacks is almost double the occurrence in whites and more common in men than women.

 

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Leimyosarcoma

Leimyosarcoma is one of the rare and aggressive cancers known as sarcoma. It is a cancer of the smooth muscle cells. This refers to the involuntary muscles, the ones that move without a person consciously thinking about it. These include the stomach, intestines, skin, uterus and the muscle layer of blood vessels. Leimyosarcoma can be found almost anywhere in the body since blood vessels are located throughout the body. This cancer is unpredictable. It can be dormant for years then recur. It is resistant to chemotherapy and radiation and is best treated by surgical excision. Anyone who has been diagnosed with Leimyosarcoma is urged to get treatment at a Sarcoma Center. The exact cause is not known for Leimyosarcomas, but studies indicate that genetic and environmental factors play an important part.

 

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